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Lake Of Stew
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Lake Of Stew is a six-piece acoustic string band from Montreal, and they’ve been spreading their good vibes for over 8 years now. Featuring a rotating cast of lead vocalists and full-group harmonies, they sing all kinds of original tunes, from waltzes to sing-alongs, barnburners to boogies. The band is: Brad Levia (archtop guitar, slide guitar, vocals), Richard Rigby (mandolin, banjo, harmonica, vocals), Daniel Mckell (guitar, kazoo, vocals), Mike Rigby (guitar, mandolin, vocals), Julia Narveson (gut-tub bass, bass, fiddle, banjolin, vocals) and Dina Cindric (accordion, banjo, piano, ukelele, bass, vocals.) While influenced by old time traditionals, all of their songs are original and as current as anything, with songs about everything from writing graffiti to meeting the Dalai Lama, riding the bus to school, to the healthcare system, Chateauguay and pie. Lake Of Stew was the winner of the 2009 Mimi Awards, which rewarded 5 bands for the quality of their work and was also nominated for Best Folk/Country Album Of The Year at the 2008 GAMIQ Awards. Their new effort, “Sweet as Pie” marks their new collaboration with Dare to Care Records.




Links
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lakeofstew.bandcamp.com/
www.facebook.com/pages/Lake-of-Stew/12364798258


Videos
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Lake of Stew || Sit Down On It [at Cagibi]Dare To Care Fest || Party Time with Dare To CareLake of Stew || Hey Bully


PHOTOS
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CONCERTS
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No concert announced yet

Previous Concerts

releases
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Lake Of Stew - Sweet As Pie
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The six-piece Lake of Stew recorded their sophomore effort with legendary award-winning producer Ken Whiteley, who has worked on over 125 productions throughout his career, collaborating with bands who’s musical styles range from folk and swing, to blues, gospel and children’s music (Raffi, Sharon, Lois & Bram.) Somehow, Lake of Stew can actually fit into every one of these categories, having filtered their previous pop, jazz, indie or rock ‘n’ roll references through jug band, vocal, gospel and old time folk music.

Lake of Stew aren’t revivalists, really. They simply use the traditional way of making music to have an immediate connection with the crowd, who are encouraged to learn the lyrics and serve as amplifiers. Go to their shows and be part of it.